Attack of the multicolored Asian lady beetles

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle

I can remember the first summer I saw a multicolored Asian lady beetle.

Of course, you never see just one, and that’s really the problem. These beetles (people here just call the ladybugs) come in swarms, all seemingly in a mad dash to get inside my house.

I can remember having a major problem with the multicolored Asian lady beetles a few years during the 90’s, and then they seemed to be only a minor annoyance for many years following.

This is absolutely the worst year for the multicolored Asian lady beetles that I’ve seen in a really long time. Our house is coated with these bugs, and the air is thick with bugs.

It’s a bit difficult to even make it from our house to our vehicles without having to pick a dozen or so of them off in the car, and when you look up in the air, you can see a cloud of multicolored Asian lady beetles.

It’s funny, though, because after all these years of dealing with the fall ladybug problem, this is the first year I’ve ever seen their larvae. All I can say is—gross. Have a look.

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle

About the multicolored Asian lady beetle

According to the USDA, the multicolored Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis) is actually a native insect to Asia, and was imported and in the United States as early as 1916 in attempts to naturally control certain insect pests.

While the multicolored Asian lady beetle may be considered a beneficial insect, anyone living in areas dealing with the ladybug plague this fall would probably disagree. I know I disagree.

What’s that smell?

If you’ve ever dealt with these insects, you also know that they emit a horrible STINK when you smash them. This is a defensive reaction known as “reflex bleeding,” in which a yellow fluid with a terrible odor is released from the beetle’s leg joints.

Trust me, it’s gross.

Are you dealing with the Asian multicolored lady beetles this season? Are you finding this year worse than others?

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  1. They made an appearance yesterday. It’s nuts how out of nowhere they are everywhere.

  2. Yes, these are such a pain! The first time we were invaded at the old house I kept thinking they won’t live that long and just lived with them in the house. I didn’t have the heart to kill them. But they do live a very long time, maybe because they are nice and warm inside?

    The next year I knew better and didn’t spare the ones that made it inside.

    Hoping they won’t make an appearance at the Blue Cottage…

  3. Thankfully I’ve never dealt with those bugs out here in California! Those look pretty yucky!

  4. The larva and pupa certainly are creepy looking. If someone with a bug vac could vacuum them up they could sell them or at least move them to an agricultural area. I wonder if there are people around who do that like they do with bee swarms. I had to buy ladybugs for my garden this year because of aphids and they did a fabulous job getting rid of them. I don’t have swarms of them like you do. That is definitely overkill.

  5. YES! It just started yesterday, our windows are COVERED in them. I hate it when they start popping up everywhere inside. You take a step on the carpet and crunch. Put your arm down on the counter, crunch. And the worst, roll over in bed……..crunch!

    • Ugh, finding bugs in bed is the worst. Here in Pennsylvania, the issue is with stink bugs – so on top of the gross crunch sound, there’s an awful smell.

  6. Yes! I have them all over my house. They bite, too! Or sting, whatever they do. I found that out when I found one in my shirt! Totally freaked me out. Lol.

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